Item #6122 Le cri des africains contre les européens leurs oppresseurs, ou Coup d’œil sur le commerce homicide appelé, Traite des noirs ... Traduit de l’anglais. Thomas CLARKSON.
Le cri des africains contre les européens leurs oppresseurs, ou Coup d’œil sur le commerce homicide appelé, Traite des noirs ... Traduit de l’anglais.
Le cri des africains contre les européens leurs oppresseurs, ou Coup d’œil sur le commerce homicide appelé, Traite des noirs ... Traduit de l’anglais.
Le cri des africains contre les européens leurs oppresseurs, ou Coup d’œil sur le commerce homicide appelé, Traite des noirs ... Traduit de l’anglais.
THE BIRTH OF THE ABOLITIONIST MOVEMENT IN FRANCE
Paris, Imprimerie de L.-T. Cellot, 1822.

Le cri des africains contre les européens leurs oppresseurs, ou Coup d’œil sur le commerce homicide appelé, Traite des noirs ... Traduit de l’anglais.

8vo [20.4 x 13 cm]. 2nd ed. of the French edition. [2] leaves, ii, 57, [1] p., large folding engraved plate showing the interior of the slave ship Brookes. Occasional faint spots; membership subscription slip from the Société de la morale chrétienne pasted on the half-title sheet. In modern paper wraps. Very fresh copy.

Second edition of the French edition, and first edition published in France of this seminal text advocating the abolition of slavery. The work was first published in London by Harvey and Darton under the title The Cries of Africa, to the Inhabitants of Europe; or a Survey of that Bloody Commerce called Slave-Trade, then quickly translated into French and issued by the same publisher. The present edition was issued by the Société de la morale chrétienne, an anti-slavery organization founded in France in November 1821 that counted Tocqueville, Thiers and Lamartine among its members.

The astonishing folding engraved plate represents the section of the slave ship Brookes, built in Liverpool in 1781, which became notorious for its role in the transatlantic slave trade. Detailed illustrations and diagrams depicting the horrific conditions aboard the Brookes captured the public’s imagination and helped fuel the abolitionist cause.

Thomas Clarkson (1760-1846), a leading abolitionist in Great Britain, obtained a diagram of the Brookes from a former crew member in 1788. It depicted the ship’s cargo hold, meticulously illustrating how hundreds of enslaved Africans were crammed into the confined space, chained together in rows, with barely enough room to move or breathe. The shocking image, subsequently engraved and published in 1788 by the Plymouth chapter of the Society for Effecting the Abolition of the Slave Trade, along with eyewitness testimonies, provided irrefutable evidence of the deplorable conditions endured by enslaved individuals during the Middle Passage. 

Clarkson and other abolitionists seized upon the Brookes diagram as a powerful tool for raising awareness about the atrocities of the slave trade far beyond Britain’s shores. It was circulated throughout Europe and the Americas, serving as a potent symbol of the abolitionist movement's commitment to ending the slave trade. In 1807, the British Parliament passed the Slave Trade Act, effectively abolishing the transatlantic slave trade in the British Empire—a victory directly attributable to the efforts of abolitionists like Clarkson and the widespread dissemination of images like the Brookes diagram.

* Gay 155; Sabin 13475.

Price: $3,500.00

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