Plan parcellaire du prolongement de la rue de Rivoli.
Plan parcellaire du prolongement de la rue de Rivoli.
Plan parcellaire du prolongement de la rue de Rivoli.
Plan parcellaire du prolongement de la rue de Rivoli.
Plan parcellaire du prolongement de la rue de Rivoli.
The Extension of the Rue de Rivoli: The Beginnings of the Haussmannization of Paris
Official Folding Plan Measuring 3.6 Meters in Length
[Paris] / [Cartography] / [Baron Haussmann].
Paris, Typ. Vinchon / Gráve par Avril Frères / Lith. Lemercier, [c. 1851].

Plan parcellaire du prolongement de la rue de Rivoli.

Folding plan [39 x 20 cm; 39 x 360 cm extended], lithograph with original hand-color. Mounted on linen as issued, original title label preserved on front flap. Contemporary pencil annotations, corners of last section creased, minor edge wear, otherwise remarkably well preserved with colors still bright and vibrant.

Very rare folding plan – measuring 3.6 meters in length – produced for official use by the Paris Préfecture du Département de la Seine in preparation for extending the Rue de Rivoli from the Louvre to the Hôtel de Ville. This major initiative in urban planning, which required the erasure of several medieval streets and the demolition of numerous old buildings, would forever alter the character of the city when it was completed under Baron Haussmann (1809-91) in 1855. The Rue de Rivoli project was the first of Haussmann’s famed renovation projects in Paris, which were undertaken with a view of making the city less crowded, more salubrious, safer, and less politically volatile.

The cadastral plan, heightened with original hand color, in fact predates Hausmann’s appointment as Prefect of the Seine in June of 1853, having been printed in the immediate wake of the Law of 4 August 1851, which secured funds, granted tax subsidies, and authorized the expropriation of lands and buildings. The Rue de Rivoli was begun under Napoléon Bonaparte, running from the Place de la Concorde to the Louvre, and although its extension eastward was always discussed, work did not begin in earnest until after the Revolution of 1848, when crowds erected barricades in the narrow streets of Paris, alarming those in charge. In 1851 President Charles-Louis Napoléon Bonaparte (1808-73), soon to be crowned Napoleon III, had Prefect of the Seine Jean-Jacques Berger develop a concrete solution for the extension of the Rue de Rivoli. The present plan provides a precise building-by-building record of the Berger project, showing individual parcels, the layout of the medieval streets, and the proposed route of the Rue de Rivoli. The route is outlined in blue and annexed properties are colored in yellow and outlined in red. The plan is annotated here and there in pencil (names of proprietors, altered outlines, etc.), quite clearly by someone intimately involved in the project. Much demolition was done under Berger, but he encountered financial and technical problems which bogged down progress. In the summer of 1853, Berger was relieved of his duties in favor of Haussmann, who made several changes to the plan and pushed ahead to complete the project before the opening of the Exposition Universelle in 1855.

OCLC and KVK locate examples of this plan at the Boston Public Library, the Bibliothèque historique de la Ville de Paris, and the Bibliothèque nationale de France (but apparently without the title label).

* D. H. Pinkney, Napoleon III and the Rebuilding of Paris, esp. pp. 49 ff.

Price: $2,850.00

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