Rules and Examples of Perspective Proper for Painters and Architects, etc. In English and Latin: Containing a Most Easie and Expeditious Method to Delineate in Perspective all Designs Relating to Architecture, After a New Manner, wholly free from the Confusion of Occult Lines: By the Great Master Thereof, Andrea Pozzo, Soc. Ies. Engraven in 105 ample folio Plates, and adorn’d with 200 Initial Letters to the Explanatory Discourses: Printed from Copper Plates on ye Best Paper. By John Sturt. Done into English from the Original Printed at Rome in 1693…By Mr John James of Greenwich. Andrea POZZO.
Rules and Examples of Perspective Proper for Painters and Architects, etc. In English and Latin: Containing a Most Easie and Expeditious Method to Delineate in Perspective all Designs Relating to Architecture, After a New Manner, wholly free from the Confusion of Occult Lines: By the Great Master Thereof, Andrea Pozzo, Soc. Ies. Engraven in 105 ample folio Plates, and adorn’d with 200 Initial Letters to the Explanatory Discourses: Printed from Copper Plates on ye Best Paper. By John Sturt. Done into English from the Original Printed at Rome in 1693…By Mr John James of Greenwich.
Rules and Examples of Perspective Proper for Painters and Architects, etc. In English and Latin: Containing a Most Easie and Expeditious Method to Delineate in Perspective all Designs Relating to Architecture, After a New Manner, wholly free from the Confusion of Occult Lines: By the Great Master Thereof, Andrea Pozzo, Soc. Ies. Engraven in 105 ample folio Plates, and adorn’d with 200 Initial Letters to the Explanatory Discourses: Printed from Copper Plates on ye Best Paper. By John Sturt. Done into English from the Original Printed at Rome in 1693…By Mr John James of Greenwich.
Rules and Examples of Perspective Proper for Painters and Architects, etc. In English and Latin: Containing a Most Easie and Expeditious Method to Delineate in Perspective all Designs Relating to Architecture, After a New Manner, wholly free from the Confusion of Occult Lines: By the Great Master Thereof, Andrea Pozzo, Soc. Ies. Engraven in 105 ample folio Plates, and adorn’d with 200 Initial Letters to the Explanatory Discourses: Printed from Copper Plates on ye Best Paper. By John Sturt. Done into English from the Original Printed at Rome in 1693…By Mr John James of Greenwich.
Rules and Examples of Perspective Proper for Painters and Architects, etc. In English and Latin: Containing a Most Easie and Expeditious Method to Delineate in Perspective all Designs Relating to Architecture, After a New Manner, wholly free from the Confusion of Occult Lines: By the Great Master Thereof, Andrea Pozzo, Soc. Ies. Engraven in 105 ample folio Plates, and adorn’d with 200 Initial Letters to the Explanatory Discourses: Printed from Copper Plates on ye Best Paper. By John Sturt. Done into English from the Original Printed at Rome in 1693…By Mr John James of Greenwich.
Rules and Examples of Perspective Proper for Painters and Architects, etc. In English and Latin: Containing a Most Easie and Expeditious Method to Delineate in Perspective all Designs Relating to Architecture, After a New Manner, wholly free from the Confusion of Occult Lines: By the Great Master Thereof, Andrea Pozzo, Soc. Ies. Engraven in 105 ample folio Plates, and adorn’d with 200 Initial Letters to the Explanatory Discourses: Printed from Copper Plates on ye Best Paper. By John Sturt. Done into English from the Original Printed at Rome in 1693…By Mr John James of Greenwich.
Rules and Examples of Perspective Proper for Painters and Architects, etc. In English and Latin: Containing a Most Easie and Expeditious Method to Delineate in Perspective all Designs Relating to Architecture, After a New Manner, wholly free from the Confusion of Occult Lines: By the Great Master Thereof, Andrea Pozzo, Soc. Ies. Engraven in 105 ample folio Plates, and adorn’d with 200 Initial Letters to the Explanatory Discourses: Printed from Copper Plates on ye Best Paper. By John Sturt. Done into English from the Original Printed at Rome in 1693…By Mr John James of Greenwich.
Rules and Examples of Perspective Proper for Painters and Architects, etc. In English and Latin: Containing a Most Easie and Expeditious Method to Delineate in Perspective all Designs Relating to Architecture, After a New Manner, wholly free from the Confusion of Occult Lines: By the Great Master Thereof, Andrea Pozzo, Soc. Ies. Engraven in 105 ample folio Plates, and adorn’d with 200 Initial Letters to the Explanatory Discourses: Printed from Copper Plates on ye Best Paper. By John Sturt. Done into English from the Original Printed at Rome in 1693…By Mr John James of Greenwich.
Rules and Examples of Perspective Proper for Painters and Architects, etc. In English and Latin: Containing a Most Easie and Expeditious Method to Delineate in Perspective all Designs Relating to Architecture, After a New Manner, wholly free from the Confusion of Occult Lines: By the Great Master Thereof, Andrea Pozzo, Soc. Ies. Engraven in 105 ample folio Plates, and adorn’d with 200 Initial Letters to the Explanatory Discourses: Printed from Copper Plates on ye Best Paper. By John Sturt. Done into English from the Original Printed at Rome in 1693…By Mr John James of Greenwich.
Rules and Examples of Perspective Proper for Painters and Architects, etc. In English and Latin: Containing a Most Easie and Expeditious Method to Delineate in Perspective all Designs Relating to Architecture, After a New Manner, wholly free from the Confusion of Occult Lines: By the Great Master Thereof, Andrea Pozzo, Soc. Ies. Engraven in 105 ample folio Plates, and adorn’d with 200 Initial Letters to the Explanatory Discourses: Printed from Copper Plates on ye Best Paper. By John Sturt. Done into English from the Original Printed at Rome in 1693…By Mr John James of Greenwich.
Rules and Examples of Perspective Proper for Painters and Architects, etc. In English and Latin: Containing a Most Easie and Expeditious Method to Delineate in Perspective all Designs Relating to Architecture, After a New Manner, wholly free from the Confusion of Occult Lines: By the Great Master Thereof, Andrea Pozzo, Soc. Ies. Engraven in 105 ample folio Plates, and adorn’d with 200 Initial Letters to the Explanatory Discourses: Printed from Copper Plates on ye Best Paper. By John Sturt. Done into English from the Original Printed at Rome in 1693…By Mr John James of Greenwich.
First English Edition
Of the Most Influential Jesuit Architectural Treatise Ever Published
“A Triumph of the Engraver’s Art” (Nash)
With 106 Full-Page Engravings and 103 Extraordinary Engraved Initials
Finely Bound Subscriber’s Copy Belonging to Thomas Coningsby
London, Benj. Motte, 1707

Rules and Examples of Perspective Proper for Painters and Architects, etc. In English and Latin: Containing a Most Easie and Expeditious Method to Delineate in Perspective all Designs Relating to Architecture, After a New Manner, wholly free from the Confusion of Occult Lines: By the Great Master Thereof, Andrea Pozzo, Soc. Ies. Engraven in 105 ample folio Plates, and adorn’d with 200 Initial Letters to the Explanatory Discourses: Printed from Copper Plates on ye Best Paper. By John Sturt. Done into English from the Original Printed at Rome in 1693…By Mr John James of Greenwich.

Folio [40.8 x 23.8 cm], (10) ff. (comprised of 1 engraved frontispiece, 2 engraved titles [one Latin, one English, each with a different engraved vignette], 2-leaf dedication to Queen Anne with large engraved portrait vignette as headpiece, 1 engraved leaf listing names of subscribers, 2-leaf preface to the translation, and a 2-leaf approbation including a splendid full-page engraving of drafting table on verse of second leaf), (152) ff. comprising 101 full-page engraved plates (numbered I-C, plus a plate LIIIB) with facing letterpress explanations in Pozzo’s Latin and in English translation, (2) ff. further explanation of the first twelve figures, (2) ff. “An answer to the Objection” and index, with (103) distinct engraved or etched initials with mythological or architectural vignettes (used in 210 positions), several cancel slips to letterpress text, cancel initials at plates LXXVI and LXXVII. Bound in contemporary sprinkled paneled calf, spine elaborately gold-tooled and with morocco lettering piece, gold-tooled arms of the subscriber Thomas Coningsby on upper and lower covers, red sprinkled edges, bookplates of Jeffery Stern and Thomas Vroom inside upper cover. Some wear to joints, extremities of spine, and board edges. Occasional minor toning, the occasional minor mostly marginal stain, plates 78-82 (and accompanying text) bound in upside down, a few minor marginal tears and small paper flaws, with the engravings in fine, dark strikes. Overall very fresh.

First edition of the renowned English engraver John Sturt’s (1658-1730) tour-de-force interpretation of Fra Andrea Pozzo’s (1642-1709) influential classic on architecture and perspective, including 106 remarkable full-page engravings and 103 extraordinary engraved initials (used in 210 positions) of mythological and architectural subjects. The present copy is preserved in the binding of Thomas Coningsby, 1st Earl Coningsby (1656-1729), one of the subscribers to this ambitious publication. The work carries the approbation of the three greatest living British architects – Christopher Wren, Nicholas Hawksmoor and John Vanbrugh – who recognized the absence of any such comprehensive treatise on the subject in the English language. Publication by subscription had never before been attempted for an architectural book, and Sturt priced his edition of Pozzo at 30 shillings “in sheets”: “This was a staggering price in 1706, and the work was the most expensive architectural book to be published in Britain by this date” (Nash, p. 214).

The first volume of the Jesuit architect Pozzo’s Perspectiva pictorum et architectorum was published in Rome in 1693, with text in Latin and Italian. By the time the second volume appeared in 1700, “the first volume had been widely disseminated throughout Europe and won considerable fame for its author. The text and illustrations of the two volumes form a complete manual of quadratura painting and its elements – perspective, scenography, fresco painting, architecture, and interior decoration. The popularity of the work, however, owes as much to the beauty of the etched and engraved illustrations as to the merits of Pozzo’s method” (Nash, p. 212).

Illustrated books on technical subjects published in England at this date are rarely notable for their graphic interest or production values, especially when compared to those published on the Continent. The present work is an exception: “When it finally appeared, Rules and Examples of Perspective was a triumph of the engraver’s art. Sturt’s copies of Pozzo’s etchings had all the illusionistic brilliance of the originals, but with the added refinement of plates produced more consistently with the burin than with the etcher’s needle. In addition to the engraved copies of Pozzo’s etchings, the work is notable for a series of large engraved or etched initials specially designed by Sturt. He produced a total of 103 different initials, all historiated with allegorical, mythological, or topographical scenes” (P. Nash, p. 214). These initials are a delight to the eye and a technical achievement of the highest order.

Sturt’s Rules and Examples of Perspective is a translation of only the first volume of Pozzo’s Perspectiva pictorum et architectorum. There is some evidence that Sturt tried to rally support for an English version of Pozzo’s second edition which included a second volume, but whether through lack of funds or lack of interest, it never appeared (see Harris for this history).

Following the appearance of Sturt’s Rules and Examples of Perspective, subscription quickly became the dominant form for producing large-scale architectural books in Britain. The fascinating engraved list of subscribers here includes the names of Wren, Hawksmoor, Vanbrugh, several printers, booksellers, stationers, writing masters and bookbinders, the Royal Society savant Hans Sloane, the noted gardener Henry Wise (1653-1738), and a considerable number of carpenters, joiners, and other craftsmen working in building trades, suggesting that the book was valued in England both for its beauty and for the practical information it contained. Two women, Lady Mary Bertie and Madam Dorothea Petit, are listed among the subscribers, as is the politician Thomas Coningsby, whose arms are gold tooled on the covers of the present copy.

 

* Harris, British Architectural Books, 703; Paul Nash in Millard, British, pp. 212-14, no. 58.

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